ASP.NET Core

A 4-post collection

Blazor: Chained Binds

A chained bind is binding a custom child component's property to a property of the parent component. Maybe you've already discovered how to two-way data bind an input element. That works with the @bind syntax to do a two-way databinding between the value of the input and a property of the parent component. An example: <input type="date" @bind="[PropertyName]" /> [PropertyName] here is the name of a property present in the parent, the component that renders the input. It can also be a property of some object instance. For example if there is an object called customer you can use customer.BirthDate as the [PropertyName]. But what if we want to give the date input a little bit...

Pluralsight Course "Understanding ASP.NET Core 2.x" Updated

My Pluralsight course about ASP.NET Core 2 is one of the most popular courses I have. Many people have already watched it and I'm thrilled about the very positive feedback I'm getting about it. There is 2.x in the title so the intention of the course is that I'm updating it as ASP.NET Core minor versions come out. Since the course was created when 2.0 was released I have now updated it to reflect version 2.1. Maybe you're thinking: that's a bit late. Well I finished the updates about 4 weeks ago (I'm writing this on 20 July). During these 4 weeks I've been busy getting Pluralsight to publish the updates. I'm told the team...

Writing APIs in ASP.NET Core 2.1 with the ApiController Attribute

APIs Writing Apis in ASP.NET Core until version 2.0 for me has been a great experience. I love the fact that we can now just use the same framework for both web applications and APIs. It's great to use the same Controller base class but fact remains that a Controller for an API has different needs in terms of functionality than a Controller for an MVC application that works with views. The ApiController attribute adds some great functionality to ASP.NET Core 2.1 controllers that makes life easier for API developers. Attribute routing The ApiController attribute offers a couple of very nice advantages but first a heads-up. When using an api controller you have to use attribute...

Scaling Out Your ASP.NET Core SignalR Application

Load balancers When you deploy your app to production at some point you'll want to scale out. Scaling out means running the app on multiple servers. When the app runs in the cloud scaling out is a matter of setting the number of servers you want to run. A mechanism called a load balancer will then pick a server on each incoming request. The load balancer can pick a different server in sequence or have some other logic going on to pick one. WebSockets When using web sockets there is no problem. Once the web socket is established it is like a tunnel between one server and the browser. But when using polling or long polling there might be a...